What is Merriam-Webster's Definition of An Expert?

Expert – (adjective) – having, involving, or displaying special skill or knowledge derived from training or experience.

While we can’t claim to be experts in everything, when you have a process problem that can benefit from an extra set of eyes or hands, that is where our skilled technical staff thrives.

Meet Your Problem Solvers

What is our recipe for an expert?
1. Infinitely curious about how stuff works
2. Enjoys rolling up their sleeves and solving a problem that no one else can
3. Always enjoyed show and tell

Put this all together and you have an idea of what makes our Technical Team tick. Our team has built their street cred at several industry trade shows, presenting real life examples of how we have improved a process or increased productivity for our customers.

What do you want to learn more about?

We have a talented bullpen of technical experts ready to bring their skills to your cleaning, finishing and treating process.
 

Explaining the dirty details of better metal cleaning

A conversation with Hubbard-Hall’s Joshua McClellan As a Hubbard-Hall application engineer, Joshua works closely with customers to understand their specific operations and applications of cleaning chemistry to get better results with less chemistry. He has worked with multiple chemical businesses over his career, specializing in chemical application technologies. Download PDF What are the p... Read More
 

Bob's Brain: Heat Treating

The heart of industry, almost nothing can be manufactured without heat-treating. We recently caught up with Bob Farrell (Senior Vice President and Technical Director at Hubbard-Hall) and asked him a few questions about the heat-treat market, what he has seen in his 30 years of experience and what lies ahead for manufactures using these applications. Read More: Download the interview PDF Why are m... Read More
 

Bob's Brain: A Review of Functional and Decorative Black Oxide Coatings

Black oxide is the conversion of a base metal material to an oxide of that base metal material. A prime example would be Fe3O4, which is black iron oxide, otherwise known as magnetite; another is a CuO, or copper monoxide. It occurs when the chemicals react with a base material to form an oxide of the base’s primary constituent. In the case of stainless steel, not only does it form oxides, b... Read More
 

Interview: Cool facts about heat treat salts

A conversation with Hubbard Hall’s Jerry Dwyer Jerry Dwyer CEF, is Hubbard Hall’s market manager for product groups pertaining to heat treating, black oxide and phosphates. His background and experience have established him with knowledgeable insight into the world of heat treating and metal finishing. Dwyer specializes in the above processes and has over a thirty-year history in the h... Read More
 

5 Steps to Adding Electropolishing

Surveys show that only 25% of all metal finishing operations in North America offer electropolishing to their customers. With a possible rise in the need for electropolishing thanks to reshoring efforts for medical parts and equipment, demand could outpace availability as manufacturers seek to find finishers to electropolish those parts to a high specificity. Fortunately, electropolishing lines ar... Read More
 

What Causes Hazy Effluent?

Tackling Hazy Water Hassles With Absolute Clarity When it comes to cloudy wastewater, there are any number of reasons you can find yourself in a fog. From residual emulsified oil and surfactants to overdosing on polymers and coagulants, Hubbard-Hall’s wastewater treatment technical team can help you diagnose and treat the problem.  What are some of the reasons for the cloudy wastewater?... Read More
 

Myth #1

Myths of Cleaning Myth 1 of 8: Water is Obviously “Cheaper” than Solvents Regular city water alone won’t clean anything. It needs surfactants and detergents that lower surface tension and remove soils. These are consumed during cleaning and need replenishing. Higher temperatures are needed to activate cleaning chemistry, which is important for ensuring good wetting and evaporatio... Read More
 

Myth #2

Myths of Cleaning Myth 2 of 8: Aqueous Systems Can’t Be Used in Critical Cleaning First, let’s be clear that “critical cleaning” has a very specific meaning. It refers to the removal of sub-micron particles and non-volatile residues. It’s required when any surface contamination would yield adverse effects. While many processes and products might qualify, the term is u... Read More
 

Myth #3

Myths of Cleaning Myth 3 of 8: Aqueous cleaning is always “safer” than solvent There’s a misapprehension that “Aqueous Cleaning” refers to cleaning with water. While water is involved, and under the right circumstances can be a solvent, in aqueous cleaning systems the water contains additives. These have several functions, such as lowering surface tension, creating ch... Read More
 

Myth #4

Myths of Cleaning Myth 4 of 8: Solvents are all BAD! “Solvent” is an extremely broad term. Any substance that will dissolve another is, technically, a solvent, and that includes water. However, in popular parlance, “solvent” often refers to chemicals that will dissolve oil and grease. Examples include acetone, isopropanol, ethanol and butyl acetate. If these names appear fa... Read More
 

Myth #5

Myths of Cleaning Myth 5 of 8: Solvents will all be banned through government regulation It’s true that for some classes of solvents their use either has been or is in the process of being phased out. However, many others are still permitted, although in some cases there are regulations regarding aspects of usage like ventilation. In general, authorities like the EPA take the view that solve... Read More
 

Myth #6

Myths of Cleaning Myth 6 of 8: Solvent cleaning is always the most efficient process Solvents make very effective cleaners, in the right application. The key points to consider are, what is being cleaned, what is it being cleaned of, and what is it being cleaned for? Solvents are highly effective for dissolving oils and their low surface tension enables good penetration and evaporation. Solvent cl... Read More
 

Myth #7

Myths of Cleaning Myth 7 of 8: Market is Dominated by Aqueous Cleaning Compared to solvent cleaning, aqueous is still the newcomer, even though it has been in use for two decades. Use of aqueous cleaning is undoubtedly on the rise, but to say it dominates the market is just incorrect. Precision cleaning in particular, is a sector where solvent cleaning dominates. The key, when choosing a cleaning ... Read More
 

Myth #8

Myths of Cleaning Myth 8 of 8: Cleaning is All About Picking a Chemistry Chemistry is important for sure. The solvent or aqueous cleaner must be compatible with the soil or contamination you want to remove, but it’s more complicated than that. Consider also the material to be cleaned: some cleaners will damage some surfaces. Then there’s the degree of cleaning or cleanliness desired. O... Read More
 

Tiede’s 4 Recipes for Wastewater Success

Our Aquapure Technical Product Manager, Robin Tiede, will admit that solving the wastewater puzzle can take time and a lot of sleuthing but believes if you follow certain steps it can help reduce this time. In a four-part monthly series, Robin will provide recommendations and tools that can help shorten the time it takes to solve any upsets and will also cover some potential solutions to typical W... Read More
 

Cleaning High-Value, Complex Parts for Aerospace Applications

Recently, a leading manufacturer of high-value parts for the aerospace industry ran into a cleaning challenge – namely, the cleanliness of parts going through its vacuum brazing process. The existing process was falling short – and experiencing a high field failure rate. Compounding the challenge was a large variation of aluminum alloys and forming processes of the parts. The customer ... Read More
 

Aquapure WasteWater Treatment Corner

All Polymer Flocculants are not created equal. While metal bearing wastewater is best served through the use of a high charge, high mole weight, anionic polymer. Fats’ Oils and Greases (FOG) work best with a cationic polymer. How are they used? Polymer Flocculants are used in chemical precipitation of wastewater treatment to destabilize the suspended particles and allow them to stick togeth... Read More
 

4 Requirements For A Reliable Rinsing Process

A quick list of the most important factors to bear in mind when determining your rinsing process. Water is becoming an increasingly expensive commodity with even further restrictions in certain areas of the country (pity the poor folks in California). As a result, there has never been a better time to give some thought to maximizing the efficiency of your rinsing process. Put simply, rinsing is a ... Read More